GERHARD STEENKAMP WILDLIFE AND NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY
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The Soul

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Product Description

Elephant at Nxai Pans in Botswana which form part of the Makgadikgadi Pans.

Nxai Pan is a large salt pan topographic depression which is part of the larger Makgadikgadi Pans in northeastern Botswana. It lies on the old Pandamatenga Trail, which until the 1960s was used for overland cattle drives. The area is speckled with umbrella acacias and is said to resemble the Serengeti in Tanzania. The Nxai Pan was added to the National Park System to augment the Makgadikgadi Pans National Park, thus providing an enlarged contiguous area of natural protection.

The ‘x’ represents a palatal click sound. Click sounds are typical of the Khoisan languages.

Elephants are the large mammals forming the family Elephantidae in the order Proboscidea. Three species are currently recognised: the African bush elephant (Loxodonta africana), the African forest elephant (L. cyclotis), and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Elephants are scattered throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. Elephantidae is the only surviving family of the order Proboscidea; other, now extinct, members of the order include deinotheres, gomphotheres, mammoths, and mastodons.

All elephants have several distinctive features, the most notable of which is a long trunk (also called a proboscis), used for many purposes, particularly breathing, lifting water, and grasping objects. Their incisors grow into tusks, which can serve as weapons and as tools for moving objects and digging. Elephants’ large ear flaps help to control their body temperature. Their pillar-like legs can carry their great weight. African elephants have larger ears and concave backs while Asian elephants have smaller ears and convex or level backs.

Elephants are herbivorous and can be found in different habitats including savannahs, forests, deserts, and marshes. They prefer to stay near water. They are considered to be a keystone species due to their impact on their environments. Other animals tend to keep their distance from elephants while predators, such as lions, tigers, hyenas, and any wild dogs, usually target only young elephants (or “calves”). Elephants have a fission–fusion society in which multiple family groups come together to socialise. Females (“cows”) tend to live in family groups, which can consist of one female with her calves or several related females with offspring. The groups are led by an individual known as the matriarch, often the oldest cow.

Males (“bulls”) leave their family groups when they reach puberty and may live alone or with other males. Adult bulls mostly interact with family groups when looking for a mate and enter a state of increased testosterone and aggression known as musth, which helps them gain dominance and reproductive success. Calves are the centre of attention in their family groups and rely on their mothers for as long as three years. Elephants can live up to 70 years in the wild. They communicate by touch, sight, smell, and sound; elephants use infrasound, and seismic communication over long distances. Elephant intelligence has been compared with that of primates and cetaceans. They appear to have self-awareness and show empathy for dying or dead individuals of their kind.

African elephants are listed as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) while the Asian elephant is classed as endangered. One of the biggest threats to elephant populations is the ivory trade, as the animals are poached for their ivory tusks. Other threats to wild elephants include habitat destruction and conflicts with local people. Elephants are used as working animals in Asia. In the past, they were used in war; today, they are often controversially put on display in zoos, or exploited for entertainment in circuses. Elephants are highly recognisable and have been featured in art, folklore, religion, literature, and popular culture.

Note that:

1. No framing is included in the pricing.

2. All Fine art prints are printed on Epson Cold Press fine art paper with a life long warranty.

3. Great care is taken with the packaging of your product to ensure that you receive it in good order.

4. All Canvasses and Fine Art Prints will be personally signed by Gerhard Steenkamp.

5. All Canvasses and Prints are limited to 20 per image.

6. We give you the insurance of optimum quality and professional service at all times.

7. Standard sizes are follow:

  • 16″ x 24″ = A2  = 40 x 60 cm
  • 24″ x 36″ = A1 = 60 x 84 cm
  • 32″ x 48′ = A0 = 80 x 120 cm

8. In case of an image being an odd size the longest side will stay the same, as on the order, and the shorter side will be altered to suite the dimensions of the image.

Thank you for shopping with us.

Additional Information

Size

16″ x 24″ (A2), 24″ x 36″ (A1), 32″ x 48″ (A0)

Product

Canvas, Fine Art Print

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